“Where the Sea Meets the Sky”

The 2023 UELAC Dominion Conference and AGM

June 1-4, 2023

Hosted by Pacific Region Branches of the UELAC

 

 

Return to: 2023 UELAC Dominion Conference

 

 

Virtual Presentations & Guest Speakers

 

The 2023 UELAC Conference is pleased to feature the following guest speaker presentations:

 

1. “The Crown in Canada: Rooted in History (from the podcast series The Crown in Canada)
Presented by Nathan Tidridge, UELAC Honorary Fellow

2. “The Heroic Story of Robert Land UEL
Presented by Ruth Nicholson, UE (Central West Region)

3. “Early British Columbia Descendants of United Empire Loyalists: Who was in B.C. for the 1881 Census?
Presented by Mike Woodcock, UE (Pacific Region)

4. “Affirmations of Black Loyalists
Presented by Allister J. Barton (Atlantic Region)

5. “Hidden Stories
Presented by Jennifer DeBruin, UE (Central East Region)

6. “Loyalist Descendants in Ross Bay Cemetery
Presented by Mike Woodcock, UE (Pacific Region)

7. “Reading, Writing and ‘Rithemetic
Presented by Jean Rae Baxter, UE (Central East region)

8. “The Black Loyalists of the Maritimes
Presented by Stephen Davidson, UE (Atlantic Region)

9. “The Crown and the Square
Presented by Alex Greer, UE (Pacific Region)

10. “The Voyage of the Psyche: A British Prefabricated Warship in the War of 1812
Presented by Tim Compeau, UE (Central West Region)

11. “Loyalist Legacies in the Prairie Provinces of Canada
Presented by Barb Andrew, UE (Prairie Region)

 

Accessing The Presentations

 

All of the virtual guest speaker presentations will be available at the appropriate scheduled time and Zoom Invite Links will be forwarded at a later date.

For those attending virtually and accessing the presentations online, please ensure you are registered appropriately via the online registration form: https://forms.gle/PiDzSJMUkdPU6t2SA. Information on registration and payment options is outlined on the registration page and on the form itself.

“In-Person” attendees will have opportunity to view the presentations at their own leisure both during and following the conference.

Loyally,

The 2023 UELAC Hybrid Pacific Region Conference & AGM Planning Committee

 

 

 

Presentation Outlines & Speaker Bios

 

 

1. “The Crown in Canada: Rooted in History”

Presented by Nathan Tidridge, UELAC Honorary Fellow

You can’t tell the story of Canada without the Crown. It is an institution that is not only embedded in our Treaties, but also Canada’s democratic institutions, and countless other aspects of our day-to-day lives. The social, political, and cultural landscapes of this land for the past 500 years are inextricably linked with the Crown – the evidence of this can be found in visible examples from street signs to military cap badges, Royal Visits to Royal Commissions, but there are also the unseen aspects of the institution which Dr. David A. Smith, an expert on the subject, characterised as: The Invisible Crown.

During her historic installation address, Mary Simon, Canada’s first Indigenous Governor General, pledged that she would use her new role, “to hold together the tension of the past with the promise of the future, in a wise and thoughtful way.” The Crown, due to its history in this land, embodies that tension. It is this very tension that makes the Crown not only relevant, but indispensable to the future of Canada. Restored through ceremony by the Sovereign and his representatives and made operational by governments acting in his name, the Honour of the Crown provides a path to reconciliation, but it also holds out the possibility of meaningful relationship through mutually respected symbols, recovered ceremonies and new protocols.

We will take look at the Crown in this land in a thoughtful way and see what we can learn about our country – both its tensions and its promises.

Nathan Tidridge

Nathan Tidridge

A commitment to deepening our understanding of complex historical experiences and how they connect to the present is a hallmark of Nathan Tidridge’s life work. An avid researcher and educator, Nathan’s areas of expertise include the Crown in Canada, Indigenous and Crown relations in the Canadian context, and local history.

Nathan teaches Canadian history, government, and Indigenous studies at Waterdown District High School (Ontario). He is an engaged, and engaging, educator who inspires the same in others. The trusted relationship he has formed with Indigenous communities, learning their culture and traditions, is evidence of an individual who understands that to teach is also to listen and learn. Nathan received a Governor General’s Award for Excellence in Teaching History in 2020.

Nathan is also an accomplished author, having penned several notable books. Among his titles are Canada’s Constitutional Monarchy (2011), Prince Edward, Duke of Kent (2013), The Queen at the Council Fire (2015), and his latest release, The Extraordinary History of Flamborough: Platinum Jubilee Edition (2022). He has also been published in national publications, including Maclean’s Magazine, The Globe and Mail, and The Public Policy & Governance Review, among others. His appearances on numerous television and radio programs speak to his being a sought-after expert, known for his engaging manner. Audiences at his many presentations are captivated by Nathan’s passion and extensive knowledge, as was the case when he presented “The relationship between Haudenosaunee Confederacy and the Crown” at UELAC’s first virtual conference hosted by Bridge Annex branch in 2021.

Nathan is an active member of many organizations. He is currently a member of the national advisory board for the Prince’s Trust Canada, Vice-President of the Institute for the Study of the Crown in Canada (2005-present) and was a board member of Ontario Heritage Trust (2015-2021). He has deservedly been the recipient of several awards and honorariums, including the Meritorious Service Metal (2018) for his work in educating Canadians on the role of the Crown and its relationships with Indigenous communities, and in that same year, he became the first Honorary Fellow of the United Empire Loyalists’ Association of Canada (UELAC).

Visit www.tidridge.com to learn more.

 

 

2. “The Heroic Story of Robert Land UEL”

Presented by Ruth Nicholson, UE (Central West Region)

Ruth relays one of her favourite local Loyalist stories when she reveals the heroic and troubled life of Robert Land. Ruth will express the story in a novel format, visually through drawings and her flannelboard. Over 80 programs were given by Ruth, during the pandemic to tell Bible stories to her Sunday School class. This has developed into a presentation structure that engages all ages through storytelling and art.

Robert Land was one of the first Loyalists to settle at Head of the Lake, now the city of Hamilton, Ontario. He went through many difficulties before reaching this end point and he was not a happy man when he first arrived. This is a story of bravery, perseverance, honour, loss, reunion, and rebuilding. It is a story of character and anyone experiencing this story must admire the strength of character encapsulated in the person of Robert Land.

Ruth Nicholson

Ruth Nicholson

Ruth Nicholson graduated with a B.A. in Fine Art from McMaster and a B.Ed. from Queens as well as certification in Librarianship from Brock. She has been married for 47 years to her McMaster sweetheart, David Nicholson. They have three children and two grandchildren.

Ruth taught elementary school for 44 years with The Halton District School Board. She has been recognized both provincially and at the Board level with awards for innovation and creativity in education.

Ruth is past president of the Hamilton Branch UELAC and has been the UELAC Dominion Conference Chair since 2013. She has been asked to speak across the province of Ontario from Kingsville to Kingston & has given numerous educational presentations.

Ruth has agricultural roots- born and raised in Essex County. All four of her proven Loyalist ancestors are from The New Settlement, the NW side of Lake Erie. They are- Jacob Arner, John Cornwall, Joseph Ferriss and Henry Wright.

Ruth is very active in her community, volunteering within heritage and community groups. She has won several awards for “outstanding contributions to the understanding and preservation of our History and Heritage.” In 2021 she led a group of women from the community and her United Church who made and distributed over 5000 masks. The group was recognized as “Pandemic Heroes.” In 2021 Ruth was nominated for Senior of the Year for the City of Hamilton. Ruth continues to volunteer as Youth Chair at St. James United Church Waterdown, and she actively supports the local Migrant Workers.

Ruth enjoys her vegetable garden & turning the harvest into pickles & preserves. She loves baking and painting with her 11-year-old granddaughter, as well as golfing with her husband.

 

 

3. “Early British Columbia Descendants of United Empire Loyalists: Who was in B.C. for the 1881 Census?”

Presented by Mike Woodcock, UE (Pacific Region)

The first Canadian census was taken in 1851 and included Canada East (Quebec), Canada West (Ontario), New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. With British Columbia joining Canada in 1871, this was too late to be included in the national 1871 Census so the first census that included B.C. was not until 1881.

The overall census count of B.C. in 1881 was only 48,379 (approximately 1% of Canada) and close to half of that total was the existing aboriginal population. For the non-aboriginal population of approximate 25,000, only 2,712 or 11% were born in the other Canadian provinces. This small number from other parts of Canada is understandable as this was prior to the completion of the transcontinental railroad in late 1885. It was challenging to get to B.C. from eastern Canada.

Some 1881 B.C. census basics are that the City of Vancouver did not yet exist in 1881 as it was still a small sawmilling settlement called Granville. Vancouver was incorporated as a city in April 1886. There was an 1881 census district called Vancouver, but this was actually all of Vancouver Island except the City of Victoria census district. The largest mainland census district was New Westminster which included the current Greater Vancouver west up the Fraser Valley to include Chilliwack and south to include Richmond. Chilliwack had been incorporated in 1873 and Richmond in 1879. New Westminster census district also included all of coastal B.C. to the top of the province. The Yale census district included the southern interior from Hope across the Thompson, Okanagan, and Kootenay regions. The Cariboo census district had most of the northern population including those who remained after the Cariboo Gold rush of 1862-65.

Given the small census numbers from other parts of Canada, the number of descendants from United Empire Loyalists (UEL) was also extremely limited. While there were not very many UEL descendants, I have found some very interesting and impactful individuals. As the 2023 UELAC Annual Conference is being held in British Columbia, it seemed important to highlight a selection of our ancestors who were here when this first census snapshot was taken in 1881. This presentation will be twenty-four short profiles of UEL descendants across the four B.C UELAC branches regions who were in B.C. during this post gold rush and pre-railroad period.

Mike Woodcock

Mike Woodcock

Mike Woodcock is the President of Victoria Branch, UELAC. Mike is descended from two Loyalist families (Woodcock from New York and Peterson from New Jersey) who fought and then fled to the Bay of Quinte area.

Like other “Loyalists Come West” families, Mike’s were part of the early 20th century western expansion. His ancestors were among the first settlers of Saskatoon. As a lifelong British Columbian and (now retired) government administrator, Mike had the fortune to live and travel in all parts of B.C.

Mike has a passion for tracing, recording, and sharing the early UE descendent presence and impact on British Columbia history. The on-line Vancouver Island Loyal-List
is available at www.uelvictoria.ca.

 

 

4. “Affirmations of Black Loyalists”

Presented by Allister J. Barton (Atlantic Region)

This genealogical research presentation focuses on the history and mythology about my African American ancestors – Black Loyalists, and General Henry Clinton’s disbanded Company of Black Pioneer soldiers – who were settled “in a town called by them, Brinley Town, within the township of Digby,” Nova Scotia. As I trace my ancestral lineage to William Barton of Brinley Town, follow the journey of his sudden, enigmatic appearance; and a series of intricate events around him.

Allister J. Barton

Allister J. Barton

Allister J. Barton began researching his African Nova Scotian ancestry since 2014. His genealogical research has become a collection of stories that affirm African Nova Scotian contributions to local history. Allister has presented his research during Black History Month to community groups, local libraries, and genealogical societies. Allister holds a Bachelor of Science from Dalhousie University, a Master of Education in Lifelong Learning from Mount Saint Vincent University, and loves reading to his two little girls, Lilia, and Zoey!

 

 

5. “Hidden Stories”

Presented by Jennifer DeBruin, UE (Central East Region)

Uncovering Hidden Stories of the Loyalist Era … Ever wonder what your Loyalist ancestors or others of the Loyalist-era experienced, but have limited or no direct evidence of what they went through?

In this presentation, we’ll explore the Loyalist-era through the experiences of three individuals of various backgrounds whose lives were changed by the American Revolution (1775-83). Using these stories, I’ll share how to piece together evidence to support a plausible experience of an ancestor, or person of interest, using a variety of approaches and resources.

As an author of fact-based, historical fiction, my work is heavily researched using vetted sources spanning aspects such as politics and war strategy to the social norms of communities, families, and individuals of the period – I even research period language and weather! As each part comes together, and the story unfolds, we’re immersed in experiences not of our time. Through new approaches and insights, and a little persistence, what once seemed hidden is revealed.

Jennifer DeBruin

Jennifer DeBruin

Researcher, author and speaker Jennifer DeBruin has deep ancestral roots in Quebec, Eastern Ontario, and Colonial America, and a passion for researching and sharing the stories of ordinary people who experienced extraordinary history. With a focus on North America from the 16th – 20th centuries, she seeks to expand the understanding of our complex history from a variety of perspectives.

Author of three fact-based, historical fiction novels based on North American history, Jennifer is currently writing her first non-fiction book and her fourth historical novel. She also writes historical pieces, which have appeared in several publications.

In addition to her research and writing, Jennifer has been a professional speaker for over 20 years, is an active volunteer in the historical community, and her most recent venture is an historical podcast, the aWOKEning, which presents information that expands the Canadian historical narrative and our understanding of the past, present and future.

Visit jenniferdebruin.ca to learn more.

 

 

6. “Enhancing Victoria’s Loyalist History: An exploration of UEL Descendants Buried in Ross Bay Cemetery”

Presented by Mike Woodcock, UE (Pacific Region)

It is often noted that the who’s who of British Columbia are basically buried in Ross Bay Cemetery including Sir James Douglas, Emily Carr, Billy Barker and Judge Sir Matthew Baillie Begbie. The cemetery is a noted heritage site and is on the Canadian Register of Historic Places. 2023 marks the 150th anniversary of the first of 30,000 burials in Ross Bay Cemetery. Ross Bay Cemetery was the main cemetery for Greater Victoria for 50 years since it opened in 1873 until its primary role was eclipsed by the opening of Royal Oak Burial Park in 1923.

Given the great distance from the Loyalist heartlands and no transcontinental rail link until 1886, Ross Bay Cemetery has never been considered a who’s who burial site for Loyalist descendants. The generally accepted short list of Loyalist descendants buried at Ross Bay Cemetery does not extend far beyond Amor De Cosmos, Francis Jones Barnard, Albert Norton Richards and John Hamilton Gray. Through researching family trees, newspaper archives and cemetery records, we have worked towards discovering, documenting and highlighting the number of Loyalist descendants buried at Ross Bay Cemetery. While we have been able to add a good number of UEL descendants, there are also some assumed UEL descendants that should be expunged.

To commemorate the 150th anniversary of Ross Bay Cemetery and quantify the UEL descendent role in that history, we have found over 300 UEL descendants buried at Ross Bay. The 300 ancestors equate to approximately 1% of all burials at Ross Bay. This presentation comprises 23 short profiles of some of these UEL descendent individuals/families buried in Ross Bay Cemetery in its first 50 years (1873-1923). Many of these people had fascinating lives and provide great insights into B.C. history. The profiles begin sequentially with UEL descendants connected with the fur trade and complete with the ending of World War I. Between these time brackets, some of the key events our UEL descendants were part of include gold rushes, railroad construction and the confederation with Canada.

Mike Woodcock

Mike Woodcock

Mike Woodcock is the Branch President of Victoria UELAC. Mike is descended from two Loyalist families (Woodcock from New York and Peterson from New Jersey) who fought and then fled to the Bay of Quinte area.

Like other “Loyalists Come West” families, Mike’s were part of the early 20th century western expansion. His ancestors were among the first settlers of Saskatoon. As a lifelong British Columbian and (now retired) government administrator, Mike had the fortune to live and travel in all parts of B.C.

Mike has a passion for tracing, recording, and sharing the early UE descendent presence and impact on British Columbia history. The on-line Vancouver Island Loyal-List
is available at www.uelvictoria.ca.

 

 

7. “Reading, Writing and ‘Rithemetic”

Presented by Jean Rae Baxter, UE (Central East region)

We have always assumed that the first Loyalists to arrive in what is now Canada were too concerned with mere survival to worry about schools for their children. We took for granted that some parents had the skills to pass on the fundamentals of reading, writing and arithmetic to their offspring. We were correct about both assumptions. But if we thought that the state of education in those days was the same everywhere Loyalist made their new homes, then we were mistaken.

This presentation covers the years 1784 to 1810. In it I move from east to west: Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Lower Canada and Upper Canada. What surprising difference there were! Some resulted from social differences in leadership from province to province. For example, on Prince Edward Island several prominent members of the Loyalist community signed their name by making a X, while the leadership of New Brunswick (split off from Nova Scotia in 1784) was dominated by graduates of Harvard and Yale. Understandably, their approach to education was not the same, nor was their sense of urgency in setting up schools.

In both Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick, those interested in education were starting from scratch. But in Nova Scotia, the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel had established schools shortly after the founding of Halifax in 1749. In Quebec, where there were already excellent French-language schools run by the Jesuits, the English had lost to time in setting up their own school system. It had its beginning in 1760, when Governor James Murray appointed the first schoolmaster and allotted “a dwelling for him and a good place for a classroom.” There were already English language schools in Montreal for the children of Loyalists upon their first arrival. In Upper the situation was again different. Lieutenant Governor John Graves Simcoe was eager to have good schools for the Upper Classes to be trained for leadership but indisposed to do anything to encourage education for the common people. However, the Upper Canada Loyalists lost no time in looking after this business for themselves.

This presentation is not preoccupied with the usually tortuous course of government legislation for schools. Instead, the emphasis is on people—the wealthy who wanted good schools for their own offspring, the ordinary people who valued a basic education, and the schoolteachers themselves, an assortment of men—most were men—some learned and some barely literate. You will learn about curriculum, as well, for in those days it was not just “Reading, Writing and ‘Rithmetic.”

Jean-Rae-Baxter

Jean-Rae-Baxter

Jean Rae Baxter is the descendant of settlers who arrived in New France in the 17th century, Loyalists who came to the New Settlement on the north shore of Lake Erie following the American Revolution, and immigrants from Germany in the 19th century. There have been many family stories to awaken her interest in Canada’s history.

Baxter holds a B.A. and M.A. from the University of Toronto and a B.Ed. from Queen’s University. Her historical fiction has won recognition in both Canada and the United States. In 2022 she was nominated for the Governor General’s History Award for Popular Media: the Pierre Berton Award. Her six historical novels about the Loyalists, covering the years from 1777 to 1793, have won all three Moonbeam Awards for Young Adult Historical fiction. These are: the Gold Medal (Broken Trail, 2011), the Silver Medal (The Knotted Rope, 2022), and the Bronze Medal (Freedom Bound, 2012). She is especially proud of the Moonbeam Awards because they are American, and she writes from a loyally Canadian point of view.

She has also received the Hamilton Arts Council Award for Young Adult Literature as well as a City of Hamilton Heritage Award for her writing. Her books have been shortlisted for the Ontario Library Association’s Red Maple Award and British Columbia’s Stellar Award, and she has received an Honourable Mention at Boston’s New England Book Festival.

Visit jeanraebaxter.ca to learn more.

 

 

8. “The Black Loyalists of the Maritimes”

Presented by Stephen Davidson, UE (Atlantic Region)

Forgotten for almost two centuries was the fact that one out of every ten Loyalist refugees who settled in Atlantic Canada were men and women who had once been enslaved by American Patriots. Now known as the Black Loyalists, these African descendants settled along the coast of Nova Scotia and the banks of New Brunswick’s St. John River, becoming the first free Black founders of Canada. Among their descendants were Abraham B. Walker, New Brunswick’s first Black lawyer, civil rights activist, and magazine publisher, as well as Rose Fortune, Canada’s first female police officer. Stephen’s talk will trace the story of the Maritimes’ free Black settlers from their arrival in 1782 to the founding of Sierra Leone in 1792 by almost 1,200 Black Loyalists who had once called Atlantic Canada their home.

Stephen Davidson

Stephen Davidson

Born to two New Brunswickers who had 14 Loyalist couples in their family trees, Stephen Davidson spent his formative years in Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, New Brunswick, and Maine. His 1975 bachelor’s thesis on an aspect of Black Loyalist history became the basis for his contribution to the Dictionary of Canadian Biography.

An elementary school teacher for more than 30 years, Stephen pursued genealogical and Loyalist historical research in his spare time. His first article for Loyalist Trails, the story of a Loyalist woman (Polly Jarvis Dibblee), was submitted in 2006; his 800th article (Ten Loyalist Silversmiths) was published in the fall of 2022. In addition to contributions to the Loyalist Gazette, Stephen’s research has appeared in multiple genealogy periodicals, a national children’s magazine, The Beaver, and a number of Maritime newspapers.

He has served as a consultant for two Loyalist websites created by the University of New Brunswick, a speaker at two UELAC Dominion Conferences, a researcher for Peter C. Newman, and the author of two books on Black Loyalists. Stephen and his wife live in Lower Sackville, Nova Scotia where they raised two daughters and now enjoy the proximity of two grandsons.

For the benefit of those who will be attending the conference in person, you might want to consider having my two books about Black Loyalists at your book table (Black Loyalists in New Brunswick and Birchtown and the Black Loyalist Experience from 1775 to the Present). The New Brunswick Branch of the UELAC is the publisher of my 2015 book, The Burdens of Loyalty: Refugee Tales from the First American Civil War, about 111 Loyalists — most of whom settled in New Brunswick. Among other things, the latter book features an annotated list of the 209 passengers aboard the first ship to bring Loyalists to New Brunswick.

 

 

9. “The Crown and the Square”

Presented by Alex Greer, UE (Pacific Region)

The Freemasons, or Masons, has been a prominent social institution in the English-speaking world since the early 1700s, and some United Empire Loyalists were Masons. Who were and are the Masons? What brought about the development of Masonry in Great Britain in the 1700s, and its spread to the American colonies? Who were the Masons among the United Empire Loyalists?

The Masonic Order, or the Masonic Lodge is a fraternity with deep philosophical underpinnings. Its ancient origins “craft” are claimed to have come from many ancient sources. It is agreed by most historians that those builders of Europe’s medieval cathedrals, the guilds of the stonemasons, eventually fell on hard times by the 1600s, at which they started to invite professionals, merchants, aristocrats and even royalty to join their lodges. From the 1700s lodges were dedicated to building the moral and ethical character of their members, as the trade of the stone mason was and is used as allegories to teach lessons through the system of degrees, which are taught in secrecy.

In 1717, four such Lodges in London assembled and formed the Grand Lodge of England. From that point Masonry grew in Britain, as many prominent people sought membership. With the links of culture, language and trade between Britain and the British North American colonies, Masonry spread across the Atlantic. The first known Masonic Lodge was formed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in the 1730s. The Lodge itself didn’t take any side on the political issues, but in the debates over American independence, individual Masons took sides. Many leaders and common men on both the Patriot and Loyalist sides were active Masons. After explaining the beginning, growth and migration of Masonry to the thirteen Colonies, this presentation will focus primarily on prominent and ordinary men who were both Free Masons and United Empire Loyalists.

Alex Greer

Alex Greer

Alex Greer is originally from Peterborough, Ontario. He has UEL ancestors on his mother’s side (Pringle from New Jersey, Harris, and Huff from New York). He is a graduate of Queens University, Kingston, Ontario. His service in the Royal Canadian Navy brought him to Victoria in 1990, and once he retired from the service in 2013, he decided to settle in Victoria. Since then, he has worked in the Canadian Forces reserves and with the Corps of Commissionaires. His interest in his family tree brought him to the Victoria Branch of the UELAC where he is active as the Branch Newsletter Coordinator. Alex is currently working on a presentation about the United Empire Loyalists and the Irish Loyalists.

 

 

10. “The Voyage of the Psyche: A British Prefabricated Warship in the War of 1812”

Presented by Tim Compeau, UE (Central West Region)

This is the story of British Royal Navy’s attempt to transport four prefabricated warships in pieces from England to be reassembled for service on Lake Ontario during the War of 1812. Of the four, only the 56-gun frigate HMS Psyche completed its journey.

In this presentation, Tim will explore the historical and technical background of this project and will reconstruct how British and Canadian engineers,seamen, militia, and private contractors transported a deconstructed warship across the Atlantic Ocean and up the St. Lawrence River, often within cannon range of the American shore. Once regarded as an example of the wasteful hubris of the British Admiralty, a closer look at the Psyche demonstrates both the incredible capabilities and institutional limitations of the Royal Navy in the Napoleonic Era.

Tim Compeau

Tim Compeau

Tim Compeau is an assistant professor of history at Huron University College, an affiliate of the University of Western Ontario. He is the coeditor of Seeing the Past with Computers: Experiments with Augmented Reality and Computer Vision for History (University of Michigan Press, 2019). His latest book, Dishonored Americans: The Political Death of the Loyalists in the American Revolution, will be released in early 2024 by the University of Virginia Press.

He teaches and researches topics in public history and the British Empire in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. His current book project explores the role of honor culture in the Loyalist experience of the American Revolution.

 

 

11. “Loyalist Legacies in the Prairie Provinces of Canada”

Presented by Barb Andrew, UE (Prairie Region)

In this presentation, we will look at the legacies of several descendants of United Empire Loyalists that ventured west to the Canadian prairies to make and leave their lasting mark on the history of our great country.

History is a compilation of past events, political and social records for the information of present and future generations. Through good times and bad, the actions of our Loyalist ancestors and their descendants have contributed to making our beautiful country what it is today.

As noted in the UELAC publication “The Loyalists Pioneers and Settlers of the West” there were numerous Loyalist Descendants that affected western settlement including explorer Simon Fraser, Geologist Dr. Helen Belyea, Constable Jacob Degear and Church minister, social worker, and Member of parliament James Woodswoth. As homestead land grants became available in 1872 among the citizens looking for new homes, many Loyalist descendants made the move west for what they hoped would be a better life with new possibilities. All of those hearty souls made their mark on the land and in the emerging cities in some way. Like their forefathers, they endured hardships and solved problems with hard work and resourcefulness.

In this presentation we will look at the lasting contributions of Brigadier-General Henry Norland Ruttan, Richard Henry Gardyn Bonnycastle and Jasper Hawes.

Barb Andrew

Barb Andrew

Barb Andrew is a member of the UELAC Assiniboine Branch that is located in the southwest area of Manitoba. She has been involved in the Association since 1998 when she joined the Manitoba Branch. During her time in that branch, she was on a number of committees, served as president of the branch for four years and was very involved in organizing two UELAC Conferences held in Winnipeg.

Barb has served UELAC is the positions of Prairie Regional Councilor, Dominion Membership Chair, SR Vice President, and three years as Dominion President. She is currently the president and education and outreach chair of the Assiniboine Branch.