Ducit amor patriae (Latin for “Patriotism leads me”)

The United Empire Loyalists’ Association of Canada strongly supports an increased public awareness of Canada’s history. In particular, UELAC spotlights the role of the United Empire Loyalists in our national history. For many years, our membership has not only decried the lack of Canadian history in both our schools and our culture, but also has struggled to resolve this problem at both the local and dominion levels. Our Mission Statement describes our mandate struck to achieve the preservation, promotion and celebration of the history and traditions of the Loyalist period. The importance of education for youth, membership and communities is clearly evident.

Jump to: Education and Outreach | Articles & Publications | Recordings | Four Directions Youth Project

 

Education and Outreach

At the Dominion level, UELAC has created an Education and Outreach Committee to coordinate and develop resources and programmes for schools, communities and Branches across Canada. In its response, the Dominion Education/Outreach Committee has prepared and distributed the following:

In general, educators may request the teacher resource books from the history/social sciences consultant with the local public/separate school board. Alternatively they may, contact the local branch of the UELAC or send an email with mailing address and school and/or board with which they are involved to the Chairman, Education/Outreach Committee, UELAC.

Many of our branches have people who would love to participate in visits to schools or other organizations. These volunteers are willing to make presentations, create displays and participate in heritage or cultural events etc. Refer to the Branches page for more local information.

 

Articles and Publications

Ann Mackenzie M.A. has written A Short History of the United Empire Loyalists in five pages. (French translation here).

In 2011, Todd Braisted, HVP UELAC, presented a paper looking at new information which suggests that people’s loyalties (pardon the pun) changed more frequently than previously thought: The American Vicars of Bray: Exploring New Areas of Research for Loyalist Studies is available as an 8-page PDF.

Following a 2010 lecture given before the Wintonbury Historical Society in Bloomfield, Connecticut, Nova Scotia lawyer Lorne E. Rozovsky, QC presented an expanded version in 2011 before the Adult Learning Program of the University of Connecticut. Tories in the Revolution describes what had happened to the Loyalists in the United States during and after the Revolution, their reception in Canada, and the effect that the Loyalists had on the political development of the Canadian colonies and how it differed from that of the United States. While the Loyalist period has long since gone, and their descendants make up a very small proportion of the Canadian public, their thinking and their approach to political change continues to affect the thinking and political life of all Canadians.

 

Articles and Publications

On November 10, 1983, CBC Radio aired the first of two programmes in the “Ideas” series to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the landing of the Loyalists. Ideas on the Loyalists was a look at our history with dramatizations and viewpoints of contemporary authors and historians.

 

 

Four Directions Youth Project

In 2009, the United Empire Loyalists’ Association of Canada launched a fundraising effort in support of the Four Directions Youth Project, a curriculum-based educational experience developed by UELAC Honourary Vice President Zig Misiak.

The project is being undertaken in collaboration with a number of schools, groups, and First Nations, including the Chiefswood National Historic Site, which is of primary cultural and heritage importance to the Six Nations of the Grand River community. Others including re-enactor groups involved with the 200th Anniversary of the War of 1812 will be contributing their expertise to assist with this initiative.

 

→ See also: Loyalist & Historical Trivia